Friday, November 7, 2014

October Round-Up

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The Crocodile Who Didn’t Like Water by Gemma Merino
NorthSouth Books, 2014

“Once upon a time, there was a little crocodile. And this little crocodile didn’t like water.” And that makes him so sad because his brothers and sisters love water so much. He tries really hard to like it, but each attempt is a failure. What’s a little crocodile to do? The soft colors and cartoonish lines of the illustrations compliment the concise, yet compelling text. Several sets of sequential panels allow for more detail and expression and the page turns are strategically placed for maximum effect. Read this book for a preschool storytime and enjoy the moment when the kids figure out the plot twist. 

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Hana Hashimoto, Sixth Violin by Chieri Uegaki, Illustrated by Qin Ling
Kids Can Press, 2014

Little Hana Hashimoto longs to play the violin like her Ojiichan (grandfather). Hana is just a beginner, but she practices and practices for the upcoming school talent show. Her brother’s worry she will be an embarrassment, but Hana surprises them. Instead of playing classical music, she plucks out the sound of rain on a paper umbrella, lowing cows, squeaking mice, and croaking frogs. Set in Japan, the soft pencil and digital illustrations quietly compliment the descriptive, humble text. Use this book with elementary aged students to start a discussion about the musical sounds we hear in our everyday world.

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Rex Wrecks It by Ben Clanton
Candlewick, 2014

Gizmo, Sprinkles, and Wild love to build towers out of blocks, but their friend Rex just loves to wreck them! No matter how big, strong or awesomerific the towers, Rex wrecks them all. What are the friends to do? With colorful and dynamic illustrations done in ink, pencil, watercolor, and “digital magic”, this story is great for a preschool or toddler storytime. The concise text is just the right length for a read aloud and it’s fun to get the audience to “RAWR!” along with Rex.

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Telephone by Mac Barnett, Illustrated by Jen Corace
Chronicle Books, 2014

Peter’s mom wants him to come home for dinner. So she passes the message down the bird covered telephone wire. Unfortunately, the birds get the message a little confused. Will Peter understand it when it finally gets to him? The playfully humorous all dialogue text is perfect for an elementary aged audience. Corace’s watercolor, ink, gouache, and pencil illustrations feature soft colors, precise edges, and visual humor galore. Follow up with your own game of telephone.