Sunday, June 8, 2014

May Round-Up


Image from PenguinGroup.com
The Baby Tree by Sophie Blackall
Nancy Paulsen Books, 2014
9780399257186

It seems like a normal morning for this young black haired boy, but then his parents tell him there’s a baby coming. He tries to figure out exactly where babies come from, but he gets conflicting information from his teenage sister, teacher, Grandpa, and Roberto the mailman. Luckily, his parents are able to answer all of his questions. Written in first person from the boy’s point of view, this humorous story will be helpful for caregivers looking to answer their child’s questions about babies. The parents in this book have a short, but informative explanation of how a baby is made accompanied by preschool appropriate illustrations (a sperm and egg meeting in a red circle, a baby inside the womb, and a newborn baby). The back matter includes suggestions for answering the question – where do babies come from? – for children who are curious about the details. Blackall's answers are scientifically correct without being graphic. The illustrations are whimsical and fun, especially the images that the boy conjures up as he hears different explanations of the origin of babies.


Image from Ruzzier.com
Have You Seen My NewBlue Socks? by Eve Bunting, Illustrated by Sergio Ruzzier
Clarion Books, 2013
9780547752679

Can you help the poor duck find his new blue socks? He’s very sure he put them somewhere nearby. Better ask all his friends, maybe they can help. Using short, rhyming sentences and lots of questions, this animal-filled romp is fun to share at a toddler storytime. Ruzzier’s illustrations are pen and ink on watercolor paper. The setting is an amusing surrealistic twist on a storybook landscape of ponds, towers, and clinging vines set against craggy cliffs and sparse trees. Try this story for a clothing/getting dressed or color themed storytime.


Image from HouseofAnansi.com
Morris Micklewhite and the Tangerine Dress by Christine Baldacchino, Illustrated by Isabelle Malenfant
Groundwood Books, 2014
9781554983476

Morris Micklewhite lives with his mother and a cat named Moo. He’s a happy kid. He loves pancakes on Sundays. And school on Mondays. In fact, school is pretty wonderful. He gets to do puzzles, paint, and have apple juice at snack time. But the best part about school is the tangerine dress. It’s the color of “tigers, the sun, and his mother’s hair.” Morris loves the swish, crinkle, and click of wearing it. But the other kids at school don’t understand. How can Morris make the other children tease him? Will he have to give up his beloved tangerine dress?
Using a combination of straightforward realistic text and wonderful imagery Baldacchino creates the incredibly endearing story of a boy who just wants to be happy. The mixed media illustrations employ charcoal, watercolor, pastels, and Photoshop to create an atmosphere that compliments the realistic/fantastical style of writing. Most notably, the tangerine dress, soft and swirly, stands out against the black lines and definite shapes of the rest of Morris’ world.  This book celebrates being true to yourself, especially because you can think outside the lines. Share this story with preschoolers to start an age appropriate discussion on gender roles and appearance.


Image from JoreyHurley.com
Nest by Jorey Hurley
Simon and Schuster, 2014
9781442489714

This charming non-fiction book follows a year in the lives of a family of American Robins as they build a nest, have a baby, search for food, greet the morning with a song, and finally watch their offspring build a nest of its own. The illustrations, rendered in Photoshop, use clean lines and solid, soft colors. With just one word for each two page spread, this is a great book for a baby storytime. Encourage parents to talk about what’s going on in each illustration, as well as continuing the discussion beyond the book when they see birds outside.

-Amy

No comments:

Post a Comment